The Missing Motorcycle 2

The Missing Motorcycle 2

 

At the police station …

 

Grandma!

Hello

Are you okay?

I’m fine

You were speeding.

Yes. It was very cool.

Cool?

Great. It was wonderful.

It was a very dangerous thing to do.

Oh, don’t be so foolish. I was wearing a helmet.

Where is the motorcycle?

The police have it.

Really?

They took it from me when I was arrested.

 

Later …

Hello

Hello. Can we speak to the owner of the Bangmyhead NX 200?

Yes. That’s me.

Good news. We found your motorcycle.

Really!?! I thought you had it.

Well we did, and then we lost it again.

You lost it?

Someone took it.

And then?

We caught the thief.

Not my grandmother again.

No. This time it was my Uncle Fred.

The missing motorcycle(Part 1)

The missing motorcycle(Part 1)

 

__________:   Please help me.

__________:   Okay. Take a deep breath and tell me what happened.

__________:   My motorcycle has been stolen.

__________:   Are you sure?

__________:   Of course I’m sure. It was there and now it’s not.

__________:   Not what?

__________:   Not there.

__________:   Where is it?

__________:   I don’t know.

__________:   So you think it was taken?

__________:   Of course it was taken. It didn’t ride away by itself.

__________:   Okay. Where did you see it last?

__________:   It was in front of my apartment building.

__________:   Was it locked?

__________:   Yes. I locked it with a chain and a strong lock.

__________:   What kind of motorcycle is it?

__________:   A gray Bangmyhead NX200

__________:   Ooh. Nice bike. What time did you last see it?

__________:   At about 3:00pm this afternoon.

__________:   Can I get your name and address?

__________:   Yes. It’s here in my wallet. Ooops. Sorry. That’s my family.

__________:   You have a big family. Does anyone in your family have a key for the motorcycle?

__________:   My grandmother does.

__________:   Have you seen your grandmother this afternoon?

__________:   No

__________:   Let me introduce you to a woman we just arrested for speeding.

 

Allow your students to assign names or occupations to the speakers.

Although there are two more parts to this adventure, have the students create their own scenario. What happens next?

This is a good chance to try an activity on intent and inflection. Call a student aside and tell them to be happy when they read, tell the other to be angry. Next time try one sad and one happy. Try energetic and really tired. Ask the audience to judge how effectively the speakers communicated. Don’t let the audience in on what the subtext is all about. With time, they can identify things for themselves.

Passport in the car(continued from At the Mechanic)

Late or early

 

Mechanic:        Hello

Customer:        Oh, did I wake you?

Mechanic:        Did you wake me? Who is this?

Customer:        You’re fixing my car.

Mechanic:        Do you know what time it is?

Customer:        It’s late

Mechanic:        Or early – depending on how you look at it.

Customer:        I’m sorry. I didn’t know …

Mechanic:        Okay. What do you want?

Customer:        I’m at the airport and I don’t have a passport.

Mechanic:        What?

Customer:        It’s in my car.

Mechanic:        What?

Customer:        My passport. I left it in my car.

Mechanic:        And …

Customer:        I need it. Can you bring it to me?

Mechanic:        Are you insane? I’m a mechanic, not a courier.

Customer:        Could you have it sent here?

Mechanic:        What time does your flight leave?

Customer:        At 5:30.

Mechanic:        It’s – it’s 4:40. I don’t have enough time to get to the garage and get your passport to the airport.

Customer:        But I’ll miss my flight.

Mechanic:        Why don’t you take a later flight?

Customer:        I don’t know? …

Mechanic:        You’re not going to make it. It’s too far.

Customer:        Why is it too far?

Mechanic:        First I have to get to the garage; then I have to open up, and then I have to find your passport in your car. Next, I have to call a courier and wait for him to arrive. Finally, the courier has to get to the airport. The fastest that’s going to happen is two hours.

Customer:        Two hours?

Mechanic:        I think we’re really looking at three or four hours …even if I can find a 24-hour courier.

Customer:        What should I do?

Mechanic:        I think you should reschedule your flight.

Customer:        Reschedule? … for when?

Mechanic:        If I were you I’d reschedule for later in the afternoon.

 

This is a good chance to try an activity on intent and inflection. Call a student aside and tell them to be happy when they read, tell the other to be angry. Next time try one sad and one happy. Try energetic and really tired. Ask the audience to judge how effectively the speakers communicated. Don’t let the audience in on what the subtext is all about. With time, they can identify things for themselves.

On the street Dialogue

  • Thank you for stopping.
  • That’s okay. What wrong?
  • My car just stopped.
  • Why?
  • I don’t know.
  • Are you out of gas?
  • No. I have enough gas.
  • Maybe something is broken.
  • I don’t think so.
  • Did you hit anything?
  • I heard a bump earlier.
  • A bump?
  • You know … a sound.
  • What kind of sound?
  • It was like I hit something.
  • Okay. So you did hit something?
  • Maybe
  • I’ll look under the hood. Ah, here it is.
  • What is it?
  • Your radiator is leaking. Your car has overheated.
  • What’s a radiator?
  • It keeps the engine cool.
  • What’s an engine?
  • It makes the car move. Is this your car?
  • Ah, no.
  • Hmmmmm
  • Can it be fixed?
  • Sure. It won’t be cheap.

At the Dentist … appointment and aftermath

Dialogue

Making appointments

Receptionist:    Hello. Dr. Spock’s office. How can I help you?

Kirk:                  Hi. I’d like to see the dentist.

Receptionist:    Okay. Can you tell me what’s wrong?

Kirk:                  I broke a tooth. It really hurts.

Receptionist:    You’d better get here soon. Can you make it tonight?

Kirk:                  No. I’m out of town.

Receptionist:    How is tomorrow for you?

Kirk:                 That would be great. What time is available?

Receptionist:    Is 7:30 okay for you?

Kirk:                 That’s a little late.

Receptionist:    No. 7:30 in the morning.

Kirk:                  7:30 am? You’re open that early?

Receptionist:    Yes. That will be okay, won’t it?

Kirk:                  That’d be great.

Receptionist:    Can I get your name?

Kirk:                 It’s Jim. Jim Kirk. K-I-R-K.

Receptionist:    Okay Mr. Kirk. We’ll see you tomorrow.

Kirk:                  I’ll see you bright and early. Bye.

At the dentist

Dr. Spock:        Hello, How are you feeling?

Kirk:                Okay. It really hurts though.

Dr. Spock:        Well, it’s broken almost in half.

Kirk:                Can you save the tooth?

Dr. Spock:        I’m not sure. I’ll have to look at the x-ray. Oh oh.

Kirk:                 Is it really that bad?

Dr. Spock:        I’m sorry, but I’ll have to remove the tooth.

Kirk:                 Is there no way to save it?

Dr. Spock:        No. You’d be in constant pain.

Kirk: Okay.       How much will it cost?

Dr. Spock:        About 200 dollars. Do you have insurance?

Kirk:                No, I just changed jobs so I’m not covered yet.

Dr. Spock:        Sorry. I’ll give you a shot to freeze you. It may hurt.

Kirk:                 Ow, ow, ow!!! That really hurts!

Dr. Spock:        I haven’t given you the shot yet.

Kirk:                 You’re standing on my foot.

Dr. Spock:        Oh, sorry.

Kirk:                 Me too.

Conversations

Over the next few days, and weeks, I will post a few conversations that I have written over the years. These are scripted dialogues to encourage student speaking. They have sometimes been used to illustrate or to amplify a grammar point. Perhaps you’ll find them helpful, curious or useful in some small way.

This was originally scripted with no names or jobs to differentiate the speakers. It actually just had speaker one and speaker two. The conversation was used primarily as a warmer, a way to loosen the class up and get a rhythm going. I am grateful to Abbot and Costello, to whom I offer my apologies.

A telephone call

  • Hello.
  • Hello. Can I help you?
  • I want to speak to Mmmmmmm.
  • Excuse me?
  • I want to speak to Mmmmmmm.
  • Can you spell the name?
  • Spell it exactly as it sounds.
  • Please say it again slowly.
  • All right. It’s Mmmmmmmm.
  • Maybe we have a bad connection.
  • May I leave a message?
  • Okay.
  • Tell Mmmmmmmm the Doctor called.
  • Dr. who?
  • That’s right.
  • What is right?
  • No, not what.
  • Who is calling?
  • Yes.
  • Who?
  • Right.
  • I don’t understand.
  • Have you been working for Mmmmmmm long
  • I’m not sure.